Deja Book~2 Short Reviews of Books I Feel Like I Have Read Before

Darwin

Charles Darwin: Destroyer of Myths by Andrew Norman

I have read many books about Darwin, even though I find his natural science so boring that there better be some caffeine involved.  I get my kicks from the controversy that his work created and that is ultimately keeps coming back year, after year. The whole big bang, bible/God, we came from monkeys debate never gets old for me and is a great way to check for compatibility in friends and lovers. What I am saying is that I could use one or two questions, relating to him, that would easily let me know if there is even a small chance that we will get on.

1st Question ~ “How do you feel about the Scopes Monkey Trial?” (If they don’t even know what that was, they can leave, they do not pass go, cya wouldn’t want to be ya.)

2nd Question ~ “Does the Origin of Species conflict with your religious values? Please explain in detail.

See? Two questions and if the person is fairly intelligent, ready to be honest, and open; you would have a really good preview of your compatibility.

Andrew Norman covers much of what has been done before, but I enjoyed it for two things that he chose to cover and covered well. Norman included more of Darwin’s childhood than I remember reading in past works.  Yes, the most important parts of his life were his journey and then Origin of Species, but how did he get to the point that he was doing these big things? Norman tells us.

Norman has a nice way of explaining things to laymen without talking down to his readers. For example, the passage on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge was interesting; it didn’t fly over my head or put me to sleep.

Read it if you have never read anything regarding Darwin.

Charles Darwin: Destroyer of Myths by Andrew Norman

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing (April 1, 2014)
  • ISBN-10: 1628737255
  • ISBN-13: 978-1628737257

Vanish Smile

Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa by R.A. Scotti

 

Oh, Mona Lisa, Mona Lisa, men have named you…

Great art heists or fabulous forgeries are fun to read, I think. At least I never pass them by, fiction or non-fiction, they are great ways to learn about not only the art, but museums and the cities they are in as well.

However, you have to either tell me a story, like maybe Chasing Mona Lisa by Carson Morton or you better cover more facts and do it in an engaging way than the last few books. Scotti isn’t able to pull this off and there were times that it read as if had been pulled word for word from other books I have read before. (not saying plagiarism, just fatal lack of creativity)

Pass on this one for another. Chasing Mona, while fiction, covered the same material and was a more entertaining narrative.

Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa by R.A. Scotti

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf; 1ST edition (April 7, 2009)
  • ISBN-10: 0307265803
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307265807

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