The Resurrectionist: The Lost Work of Dr. Spencer Black by by E.B. Hudspeth

The Resurrectionist

  • Feeling a bit Gothic?
  • Does fantastic artwork make you swoon?
  • Does Mythology get you out of bed in the morning?
  • Do you find yourself wondering what makes the fascinating creatures of your nightmares move?
  • Does a tale of genius gone bonkers keep you warm on a cold night?

If you answered Yes to any of the above questions, get yourself a copy of The Resurrectionist.

I am a fan of beautiful books. When I say beautiful, I don’t mean just the covers; I mean wonderful packages of words and creativity that make you see and think about those old dusty tomes in a new way. They can spark wonder, conversation, awe, and yes, even horror. This is one beautiful book for those with a slightly dark bent.

Dr. Spencer Black, rising from his resurrectionist (AKA Body Snatcher) father, showed an amazing amount of potential. In an age where deformities were fodder for traveling side shows, he wanted to go deeper to find their cause and possibly “cure” them. His studies led him to a dark conclusion however. What if what we call deformities were not something gone wrong, but more a sign of what we used to be, should me, and (shudder) were meant to be?

The first 65 pages tell the story of Dr. Spencer Black and his descent into either madness or genius, you’ll have to decide on your own. The rest of the 191 pages is his opus, thought lost, The Codex Extinct Animalia.    Billed as a Study of the Lesser Known Species of the Animal Kingdom, the sort-of Gray’s anatomy look at the creatures of legend and often, our nightmares and superstitions. Here you will find the muscular structure of the Minotaur, the bone structure of Ganesha, and just how the Cereberus was able to support it’s three heads.

sphinx2

E.B. Hudspeth’s talent lay in these masterpieces.  Drawing the fearsome mythological creatures is a talent, but being able to look beneath the skin and create their inner structures is, well, a sphinx of another color. They are gorgeous.

The tale of Dr. Spencer Black is dark, very dark and may be hard to read for dog lovers, consider that a big warning, but the sheer wonder of Hudspeth’s plates has earned The Resurrectionist a place on my coffee table for it’s ability to spark conversation, horror, and even reverence at the artist’s skill.

 

The Resurrectionst:The Lost Work of Dr. Spencer Black by E.B. Hudspeth

 

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Quirk Books (May 21, 2013)
  • ISBN-10: 1594746168
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594746161

 

 

Note: This is also available as an ebook, but for the best results, it really needs to be seen in hardcover.

2nd Note: I thank Quirk Books for my copy and for continuing to challenge our idea of what a “book” really is.

signature_thumb[1]

This entry was posted in Fiction, Historical Fiction, Reviews. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to The Resurrectionist: The Lost Work of Dr. Spencer Black by by E.B. Hudspeth

  1. lulu_bella says:

    This might be the most convincing review I’ve ever read! I answered yes to all your bullet points and your review just made me want to read it more!

    • Gwen says:

      You just made my day….maybe even my week:)

      Enjoy.

      • lulu_bella says:

        SO! I know this is really old! But I did end up borrowing this one from the library and I have to say this was such an interesting read. It’s definitely horrifying and disturbing, and I’m not entirely convinced a fake autobiography was the way to tell the first half of the story, but I’m so glad I finally read this one! It was so so interesting and beautifully done. The drawings are amazing.

  2. Debi says:

    Wow. You just sold a copy of this one. My husband will definitely be getting this book under his Father’s Day tree! Thanks for the awesome review!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *