A Self-Publisher’s Companion by Joel Friedlander

by Gwen

A Self Publishers Companion

Okay, tell me the truth, have you thought of stepping out from the books and writing your own? Come on, just between us, have you? Have you been busy with NaNoWriMo?

Fine, don’t tell me. I have. However, the thought of the waiting game and rejection letters terrifies me. The emergence of the ebook market had me thinking that maybe I should take a gander at self-publishing. Enter Joel Friedlander of the blog, The Book Designer and his book, A Self-Publisher’s Companion.

This Companion isn’t a how-to, it is more of a why-for. (Yes, I just made that up) He took some of his best blog posts and wrapped it up into one package that allows you to explore your motivations, think about just what it means to be self-published, and a whole lot more.

There are a million books out there that will tell you how to self-publish, but this is the only one that asks the important questions like should you self-publish or what does success mean to you.

These are important questions to answer. I would HIGHLY recommend reading this if you have thought about or perhaps mused upon writing. It is so thought provoking and will answer so many questions you may have about self-publishing. (And it doesn’t mean that you just slap a cover on your ebook and send it out to the world)

As for me and my writing, I am still trying to figure out what success means to me and what I am hoping to gain by it. Oprah is gone, so that dream is out and I am not sure that have the stones to submit my manuscripts over and over again only to be courting rejection. On the other hand, I am not sure that being able to hold a book with my name on it (that no one would buy) is enough for me. Thanks to The Self-Publisher’s Companion, I have a better grasp of what being self-published really means and just what it might mean to me.

What does success mean to you? This book might be an important step to achieving whatever it does mean to you.

Joel Friedlander has a great blog, The Book Designer, so if you are still on the fence about this, check it out.

4 Comments to “A Self-Publisher’s Companion by Joel Friedlander”

  1. I wrote a book a little at a time between the ages of 16 and 22. Because of the wide range of maturity (or lack thereof) as a writer, I have never been able to move past that point and actually edit it. I have a thousand ideas for other books floating in my head and I would like to one day see something published. I used to frown on the idea of self publishing as I thought of it as for those who weren’t good enough to be published otherwise. Which of course is a pretty unfair attitude. Especially from someone who loves indie music and movies. As of late I have considered the idea. Less about the the idea of being a famous writer so much as being able to pass on my stories to family. I don’t know, there is something powerful about the idea of seeing one’s work in print. I’m just not sure I would ever want to pay for it.

  2. There is something powerful about seeing your work in print and I agree, I am not ready to pay big bucks just to see that happen. I think that the definition, and even opinions, of self-publishing has changed so much that we both could make it happen though. 

    While it wouldn’t be technically “in print” ebooks can be a stepping stone to making both of our ideas of success come true. Think about when you started your blog…if you are like me, you weren’t sure you could write and yet, all of your friends thought you were funny. I started writing and in finding my voice, I found that I could be funny and entertaining to others. Starting small, and therefore low-cost, can be a way of getting to that goal of seeing both of our names in print. 

    I would offer to read what you have written, but I did that with Seby and think that I scared him away! I really didn’t mean to, liked his book. 

  3. I am trying to keep a more open mind about ebooks. I remember when ebook publishers first started popping up I thought, blegh. Now much as I love the feel of an actual book in my hands that does seem to be the way the world is going.

    You can read my book if you want. It’d probably hurt your professional critiquing mind though. Very few 16 year olds can write with any quality. I know when I look back at stuff I wrote that young I tend to think I must have been drunk without knowing it. haha

  4. I am trying to keep a more open mind about ebooks. I remember when ebook publishers first started popping up I thought, blegh. Now much as I love the feel of an actual book in my hands that does seem to be the way the world is going.

    You can read my book if you want. It’d probably hurt your professional critiquing mind though. Very few 16 year olds can write with any quality. I know when I look back at stuff I wrote that young I tend to think I must have been drunk without knowing it. haha

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